Celebrate World Heart Day with Fourways Life Hospital

With the support of the cardiac team, Life Fourways Hospital has implemented a cardiac excellence programme, comprising a number of clinical interventions aligned to evidence based international best practice, in its cardiac unit. These interventions have been proven to significantly reduce the incidence of death in patients who have suffered a heart attack, and ensure that these patients are given the best possible chance of survival and a full recovery.

You too can make every day heart day. Be heart smart by adopting a healthy lifestyle, having regular check-ups and consulting a specialist if you think you might have a heart problem.

Cardiologists

  • Dr Anthony Dalby: 011 875 1920
  • Dr Anthony Yip: 011 875 1760
  • Dr Sunil Bedhesi: 011 875 1790

Cardio-Thoracic Surgeon

  • Dr George Dragne: 011 875 1820

Emergency Contact

  • Life Support Unit: 0860 444 044
  • Accident and Emergency Unit: 011 875 1444

The Heart & Stroke Foundation of SA (based at Life Fourways Hospital)

  • 011 875 1403

The Heart and Stroke Foundation South Africa (HSFSA) is powering up this September for Heart Awareness Month as they aim to reach the global goal of reducing premature deaths from cardiovascular disease (CVD) by 25% by the year 2025.

Heart disease is the world’s number one killer, claiming nearly 17 million lives every year. Although the incidence of heart disease has steadily declined in high-income countries, the burden on middle and low-income countries has never been greater. In South Africa, the burden of heart disease and stroke follows HIV and AIDS.

In South Africa 1 in every 5 deaths are caused by heart diseases and strokes, totaling nearly 82 000 lives lost annually. Despite advances in medical care, contributing factors such as high blood pressure, obesity, a poor diet, lack of exercise and pollution are all on the rise. Tobacco use has decreased, but 37% of men and 7% of women in South Africa are still regular smokers, tripling their risk of heart disease.

Heart disease in South Africa is further exacerbated by inequality. While high blood

Small Changes can make a big difference

  • Eat and drink well – to give your heart the fuel it needs for you to live your life
    • Try not to eat so many processed and pre-packaged foods
    • Cut down on sugary beverages and fruit juices
    • Swap sweet, sugary treats for fresh fruit
    • Try to eat five portions of fruit and vegetables a day – fresh, frozen, tinned r dried
    • Keep the amount of alcohol consumed within recommended guidelines
  • Stay active – this can help you reduce your risk of heart disease
    • Aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity 5 times a week
    • Playing, walking, housework, dancing – they all count!
    • Before you start any exercise plan check with a healthcare professional
  • Stop smoking – this is the single best thing you can do to improve your heart health
    • Within 2 years of quitting, the risk of coronary heart disease is substantially reduced
    • Exposure to secondhand smoke is also a cause of heart disease in non-smokers
  • Know your numbers – Knowledge is power
    • Know your blood glucose levels – high blood glucose levels can be indicative of diabetes. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) accounts for 60% of all deaths in people with diabetes, so if it is left undiagnosed and untreated it can put you at risk of heart disease and stroke.
    • Know your blood pressure – High blood pressure is the number one risk factor for CVD. It is called the silent killer because it usually has no warning signs or symptoms, and many people don’t realise they have it.
    • Know your cholesterol and BMI – Cholesterol is associated with around 4 million deaths per year worldwide, so visit your healthcare professional and ask them to measure your levels as well as your weight and body mass index (BMI). They will then be able to advise on your CVD risk so you can plan to improve your heart health.
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